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PEF & Eco-design in the footwear industry

2021-04-30T17:27:13+02:00March 26th, 2021|Categories: Articles|Tags: , , |

Demystifying the Product Environmental Footprint (PEF)  A Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) is a measure of the environmental performance of a good or service throughout its life-cycle that takes into account supply-chain activities (from the extraction of raw materials, through production and use, to final waste management). It is a method to model the environmental impacts of a product throughout its life-cycle. The PEF was implemented through the adoption of the European Commission Recommendation on the use of common methods to measure and communicate the life cycle environmental performance of products and organisations and the Communication Building the Single Market for Green Products.   The titles of these two documents [...]

What are the educational needs of the TCLF sectors?

2021-04-30T18:00:59+02:00March 10th, 2021|Categories: Articles|Tags: , , , , , , |

Discover how companies and SMEs of the TCLF sectors have evolved since 1995, what are the most significant challenges faced by the TCLF sectors in EU, and what is the strategy for matching the skills offer of VET and Lifelong Learning with the needs of the market in EU, with a focus on the case of Greece. In 2019, a total of 6.080 companies were active in the Textile - Clothing - Leather - Footwear (TCLF) sectors in Greece.           The TCLF companies employed a total of 27.500 employees. Most employees were in clothing (14.700 individuals), followed [...]

Apprenticeship: A mechanism to match skills supply and demand

2021-04-30T18:04:09+02:00February 22nd, 2021|Categories: Articles|Tags: , , , |

What is an apprenticeship? Apprenticeships are a form of work-based learning. Although existing apprenticeship schemes in Europe differ between the Members States, the Council Recommendation on a European Framework for Quality and Effective Apprenticeships [1] offers a unified definition of the key elements that distinguish apprenticeships from other work-based learning schemes. A formal apprenticeship scheme must: Lead to nationally-recognised qualifications, Combine learning in education or training institutions with work-based learning in companies, Be based on an agreement defining the rights and obligations of the apprentice, the employer, and, where appropriate, the VET institution Be financially compensated for the work-based component. Why are [...]

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